Annice Lyn
Back to list

Annice Lyn

Documentary & Sports Photographer

Annice Lyn’s previous training as a sports photographer taught her the value of vigilance — a meaningful photo can jump at you from out of nowhere. Coupled with her terrific eye for capturing moments of incredible strength and touching vulnerability, she’s an image maker like no other.

TELL US ABOUT WHAT YOU’VE BEEN UP TO.

I’m a visual artist, documentary and sports photographer at my regular job. But since MCO, I’ve realized you can’t just be one thing. Now I’ve started to take on social media management as well as a mentoring role for younger girls.

MENTORING IS NOT AN EASY TASK. WHAT’S THAT LIKE?

I initially felt like a mess. I’m hardly qualified to be guiding these kids but the desire to help them become more grounded is there. And I’ve realised you always end up learning something from them in return. Staying true to your convictions is what makes the task do-able. If you think you can, then you can. If you think you can’t, well, you won’t.

Please TELL US more ABOUT YOUR WORK AS A DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHER.

Through my work, I want to capture stories that wake people up to relevant issues like the seriousness of Covid, Asian hate crime, global issues and refugee issues. But at the same time, I don’t want to glorify this career; a photographer has got be ethical.

WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY ETHICAL?

If I’ve photographed a family that’s struggling, I make sure to provide them with some form of assistance, and to acknowledge them as part of the creation process. I will always share the story I’ve created with them and find a way to give back to them for allowing me into their lives. Photographers shouldn’t just walk away after snapping the photo they want. I have a responsibility as a documentary photographer to amplify their voice.

WHOSE STYLE DO YOU MOST IDENTIFY WITH?

There’s this photographer, Platon Antoniou. He doesn’t just capture a picture; he captures the very soul of his subjects. He’s a portrait photographer and every time he aims first to learn from the subject before picking up his camera. So similarly, when I do family portraits, I want to know my subjects and make sure my subjects are seen, heard, and most importantly, understood. As a photographer can really leave a lasting impression and we’re in a position of influence.

TELL US ABOUT WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS MALAYSIA AND WHAT THE WOMEN OF THE FUTURE AWARDS MEAN TO YOU.

I co-founded it to empower women to break barriers. This collective hub is a safe haven for female photographers, but some events are also open to men. What we might do is an afternoon tea – just for females or those that identify as female – as a safe space to hear problems, talk and understand each other. As a female sports photographer I had to deal with a lot of harassment, and I want young girls not to lose their passions after being belittled.

I won the Women of the Future Awards for S.E.A last year. But its an award that represents all women who have been suppressed. Like Kamala Harris says, she might be the first woman VP but not that last. I have to make sure I represent this position well so that the next generation of female photographers can rise higher.