The Lamborghini Countach is 50 years old. And despite arriving five decades ago, the model hasn’t really shown its age. That’s mainly because the Countach was one of the few cars that was well ahead of its time.

First breaking cover at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show, the model instantly drew attention to its sleek and futuristic design. It was an instant success and was the proverbial supercar that every kid wanted in the 70s, 80s and 90s. Most even had posters of the car plastered over their bedroom walls.

Alas in 1990, production of the car was discontinued as it made way for the Diablo. Nevertheless, Automobili Lamborghini has found a fitting way to honour the iconic supercar with a new generation model. Say hello to the Lamborghini Countach LPI 800-4.

Next Chapter For The Countach

The Countach LPI 800-4, is an emblem of the brand’s past and future. In commemoration of the legendary model and V12 heritage, the latest iteration harnesses a naturally-aspirated V12 engine and an electric motor. Combined, it delivers a maximum combined power of 814 cv and top speed of 335kmh.

A visionary masterpiece of the brand’s future, the Countach LPI-800-4 still brings forth the renowned design of the Countach from the 1970s. Its puristic lines are immediately recognisable from the Countach legacy: the patriarch of modern super sports cars and Lamborghini design.

Carrying forth the same revolutionary design and technology rule-breaker moniker it was renowned for, the new model boasts a distinctive silhouette. It embodies characteristic lines of the previous five models over nearly 20 years, concentrated into the purest realization of iconic automotive design.

In recreating those bold styling cues for the 21st century, designers have equipped the car with an essential line running from front to rear with sharp angles as well as an idiosyncratic wedge shape. The rear of the new Lamborghini Countach is immediately recognisable. The rear bumper features a lower, sleeker line, along with the ‘hexagonita’ design shaping the three-unit rear light clusters.

The LPI 800-4 sports the four-strong exhaust tail pipes of the Countach family, connected within the carbon fiber rear diffuser. The monocoque chassis and all the body panels are in carbon fibre, provide the optimum lightweight solution as well as exceptional torsional stiffness. It weighs in 1595kg (dry), providing impressive power to weight ratio.

Ready For The 21st Century

Lamborghini Countach LPI 800

Utilising modern technologies the new Lamborghini Countach features moveable air vents produced by the state-of-the-art 3D printing technology. It also boasts a photocromatic roof – changing from solid to transparent at the push of a button.

This serves as a reminder that this car, despite its historic inspiration, is a future automotive screensaver for the 21st century. Featuring an all-wheel drive drivetrain, the model sits on 20” (front) and 21” (rear) wheels, which have been created in the ‘telephone’ style of the 1980s. Each are fitted with carbon ceramic brake discs, and Pirelli P Zero Corsa tyres.

Access for driver and passenger is of course via the infamous scissor doors, first introduced on the Countach and that have become a Lamborghini V12 signature. Inside, an 8,4” HDMI centre touchscreen unique to the LPI 800-4 greets occupants.

The state-of-the-art system manages car controls including Connectivity and Apple CarPlay. It also includes a unique button entitled ‘Stile’ (Design): pressed, it explains the Countach design philosophy to its privileged audience.

Produced in a run of 112 units, the number denotes the ‘LP 112’ internal project name used during the original Lamborghini Countach’s development. The Countach LPI 800-4 will be delivered from first quarter 2022 to owners worldwide, privileged to drive a piece of automotive history reimagined for the future.

(Images: Automobili Lamborghini)

written by.
Richard Augustin
Former chef turned writer; Richard has tip-toed around the publishing industry for two decades. When not busy chasing deadlines, you can still find him experimenting with recipes in the kitchen.

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